It is not our attempt to make the death penalty ‘unnecessary’, know why the Supreme Court said so

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New Delhi. The Supreme Court on Friday said that finding ways to evade the death penalty in cases where orders have been passed after judicial inquiry would compromise the impartiality of the judicial process. The court has said this while delivering its verdict in a very important case. The Supreme Court has upheld the death sentence awarded to a man convicted of raping and murdering a seven-and-a-half-year-old mentally ill and handicapped girl in 2013. The three-judge bench has upheld the May 29, 2015 order of the Rajasthan High Court awarding the death penalty.

In this decision, the court said that this crime is highly condemnable and is shocking to the conscience. A three-judge bench of Justices AM Khanwilkar, Dinesh Maheshwari and CT Ravikumar rejected the argument that the death penalty should not be awarded on the basis of circumstantial evidence in the case. He also commented on the legal arguments frequently used by death row convicts on the issue of punishment.

Avoiding death penalty is wrong, fairness is not compromised

The Supreme Court said that it has never been the Court’s endeavor to make the death penalty in any way meaningless and non-existent for all practical purposes. In cases where orders have been passed after judicial inquiry, finding ways to avoid awarding death penalty would amount to compromising on the impartiality of the judicial process.

Tags: death penalty, Supreme Court

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